TULSA, Oklahoma - Some teachers are apprehensive about how they'll be received by lawmakers Monday.

One teacher is ready to have her voice heard and she said her concerns are for her students.

With her car decked out in a message for lawmakers and a sign to go with it, Eugene Field teacher Kirsten McCullough is ready to head to the Capitol.

She said the recent pay raise agreement doesn't tackle all of the issues plaguing Oklahoma education.

"I’m nervous because I feel like legislators aren't going to take us seriously and it's a very serious issue that needs to be taken care of," said McCullough.

She said while the $6,100 raises are a start, she wants to make sure that her students aren't forgotten.

"I realized I spend about 50 to 75 dollars a month on supplies for my kids in my classroom because we just don't have quality materials and my kids deserve quality because every child deserves the right to a quality and free education," McCullough said. 

"Our kids deserve the best and I think that if they're not willing to put them first what are they saying about the future of Oklahoma," she continued. 

According to the Oklahoma Department of Education, one of the three bills governor Fallin signed last week, House Bill 3705, gave an additional nearly $18 million for school operations.

However, teachers worry the bill isn't comprehensive enough to make classrooms smaller, bring back important programs, or bring Oklahoma schools back up to speed.

"I'm grateful but I really wish it was going towards my kids instead," McCullough said. 

McCullough said if legislators don't agree to give more funding to classrooms, she'll most likely be using that pay raise to put back into supplies and educational tools for her students.