TULSA, Oklahoma - New CDC numbers are in on the growing number of children diagnosed with Autism. In the year 2000, the number was 1-in-150 kids. Now it's as high as 1 in every 59.

The numbers are staggering but related to earlier detection and a better understanding of what autism is.

"You have your child and you have these expectations of what your life is going to be," said Mauriah Mitchell. Mauriah admits life isn't what she thought it would be after doctors diagnosed her son with Autism.

"I worry about him on a daily basis, is he ever going to talk, is he ever going to be able to be an independent adult, is his sister going to have to take care of him when we're no longer here."

A lot of unanswered questions weigh on the Mitchell family - but hidden away even during the toughest days are small victories.

"I asked him what he wanted and he pointed to me because he wanted a hug-- that made me cry - that was a good thing to happen."

Lindsi Hancock also has two kids ---her 6-year-old son Wade has autism.

"He is verbal --he can carry on a decent conversation a lot of time, but he lacks the social boundaries. It's not uncommon for my son to not be afraid of strangers, or to want to kiss someone on the lips or hug someone."

Lindsi is behind a growing support group in Tulsa that meets once a month. At least 40 families get together to talk about their children, their struggles, and their futures.

 "No one knows what you're going through like families who are on this journey. We're there for each other to support through the hard times but also to celebrate the successes," said Hancock.

They both talked about how important that support group has been for them. The support group began in September 2017. To find more information on the group you can visit their Facebook Page Here