OKLAHOMA CITY - Medical marijuana will be legal in the state of Oklahoma.

Voters have passed State Question 788.

The measure was a hotly debated issue and was a factor in driving up voter turnout during the primary election.

It will make it legal to grow, sell and use marijuana for medicinal purposes. The proposal doesn't list any qualifying medical conditions, allowing doctors to prescribe it for a wide range of ailments.

Law enforcement, business, political and faith leaders launched a late, half-million-dollar campaign to defeat it.

Dr. Kevin Taubman of SQ 788 is Not Medical Coalition released the following statement after it was declared that State Question 788 passed:

We are obviously disappointed by the outcome, as we believe 788 is simply too broadly written to be considered a legitimate medical marijuana program. However, we respect the will of the voters and our member groups look forward to working with the Legislature and the Health Department to advance common-sense regulations that benefit patients while protecting businesses and communities.

A State Question 788 advocacy group said they received numerous reports “of trickery” at polling sites where voters are not given a second ballot with the state question on it unless they ask for it.

Due to the vague language, a special session is expected to be called in the near future so the legislature can define the regulations for the new law.

Gov. Mary Fallin will announce the date for the special session.

"Please do not visit the state or county health department offices with questions relating to medical marijuana. We are still working with limited staff who deliver clinical and other services across the state,” said state health department Interim Commissioner Tom Bates after the results were announced. “All relevant information and instructions will be provided online."

Fallin released the following statement after the results were announced:

I respect the will of the voters in any question placed before them to determine the direction of our state. It is our responsibility as state leaders to look out for the health and safety of Oklahoma citizens. As I mentioned in previous public comments, I believe, as well as many Oklahomans, this new law is written so loosely that it opens the door for basically recreational marijuana. I will be discussing with legislative leaders and state agencies our options going forward on how best to proceed with adding a medical and proper regulatory framework to make sure marijuana use is truly for valid medical illnesses.