TULSA, Oklahoma - The U.S. Marshals Service is the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the country and, but when most people hear U.S. Marshals, they think of the movie, Con Air, or Air Marshals, but the Marshal Service goes so much further.

Inside the lobby of the U.S. Marshals office, you'll find bulletproof glass and a specially made door with reinforced hinges.

Once inside, is the wall of honor, in memory of the 400 deputy marshals killed in the line of duty.

Lori: "Tell me why you guys decided to put this here."

U.S. Marshal Clayton Johnson: "To remind us of several different things."

One, he says is to remember the rich history of an agency created by President George Washington in 1789.

"And, to be brutally honest, another is to remind our people how dangerous this line of work is," said Johnson.

One of the most dangerous jobs they have is capturing violent fugitives. Here, they operate the Northern Oklahoma Violent Crimes task force, a combination of deputy marshals and state and local partners. Each agency is represented in this hallway.

"Our deputy marshals and task force officers and partners cleared 13,000 warrants, which is an average of 645 a year," said Johnson. "And, they're dangerous people."

The Marshals also protect federal judges, prosecutors, public defenders, and witnesses.

"So, we are to the US federal courts, what the Secret Service is to the President," said Johnson.

And, they protect Supreme Court justices whenever the justices leave D.C. plus, keep track of sex offenders who move between states.

"If they register, fine, but, they don't register, that's a federal offense," said Johnson.

In short, the Marshals service carries out a number of unusual and extraordinary missions.