TULSA, Oklahoma - Polling locations across Oklahoma opened at 7 a.m. for an election that will decide federal, state and local races.

In the top statewide race, the Republican candidate for governor, Kevin Stitt  voted in Jenks this morning.  Stitt along with his wife and oldest daughter waited in line to vote Tuesday.

Democratic candidate for governor, Drew Edmondson voted last week in Oklahoma City.

Election officials say they always see a lot of voters come out on their lunch hour. Tulsa County election officials say they've had a large turnout since they opened their doors at 7:00 Tuesday morning, while the Rogers County's election board says some of its precincts had more than 100 voters in the first hour.

Many voters say there are multiple races they're focused on but the race for governor is getting a lot of attention. Our News On 6 poll shows Kevin Stitt and Drew Edmondson in a statistical dead heat with 6 percent of likely voters remaining undecided.

News On 6 caught up with both candidates today. Stitt says his business background makes him stand out while Edmondson says his bi-partisan approach is his greatest strength.

"I'm so different than the current administration or my opponent. They don't think there's anything wrong with the structure of state government," said Stitt.

"I've always made sure I had a Republican author and a democratic author to show on the face of a bill that I was interested in that it was bipartisan," Edmondson said. 

Along with selecting the next governor of Oklahoma, voters will decide who will be the next Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, and all of Oklahoma U.S. House representatives. As the Republicans are trying to maintain their hold on the U.S. House, They are certainly counting on all five Oklahoma House districts to go their way, but in the District 5 race in Oklahoma City, Democratic challenger Kendra Horn is actually outspending incumbent Steve Russell.

Polling locations across the state as well as a sample ballot can be found on the Oklahoma Election Board website.

Polls will close at 7 p.m.

State election officials are expecting a large voter turnout today.  They say if you vote during prime times, like during the lunch hour or after 4:30 p.m., expect to wait in line to vote.

Election officials say they always see a lot of voters come out on their lunch hour. Tulsa County election officials say they've had a large turnout since they opened their doors at 7:00 Tuesday morning, while the Rogers County's election board says some of its precincts had more than 100 voters in the first hour.

They also say voters will need to provide a proof of identity to vote.  

  1. Show a valid photo ID issued by the federal, state, or tribal government; or 
  2. Show your voter ID card; or 
  3. Sign an affidavit and vote a provisional ballot.