News On 6

TULSA, OK - Severe winter weather has many people wondering how the City of Tulsa decides which roads to clear first and why salt trucks can't reach some neighborhoods.

Officials with Tulsa Public Works said it all has to do with the traffic count.

Bridges, school zones, roads around hospitals and some hills are salted first. That amounts to 35 specific routes.

Once the main streets are cleared, selected residential streets are treated based on traffic and steepness unless there's a medical emergency.

"We do respond to any call from police, fire or EMSA. If they call us and say we're trying to get to this, it's in a residential neighborhood, we do provide them a safe way in and out," said Paul Strizek, Tulsa Public Works.

The City of Tulsa has 52 sand and salt spreaders and 119 employees who work to keep the roads clear.

They'll work 12 hour shifts.

The Tulsa area was hit with about three-quarters of an inch of ice, sleet and snow.

The Highway Patrol said it has troopers on standby in case there are any accidents.

Troopers said the biggest problem they're seeing right now is on I-40 westbound near mile marker 245 to 247. That's near the Okmulgee and McIntosh County line.

There's a big hill there and troopers said they've seen it cause a six mile back-up because semi trucks are having a hard time making their way up it.

For more on road conditions, call the Oklahoma Road Condition Hotline at (888)425-2385.

Other numbers:
Texas        (800)452-9292
Arkansas   (800)245-1672
Missouri     (800)222-6400
Kansas      (800)585-ROAD

You can track the storms with WARN Interactive Radar and get safety tips in our Storm Zone Section.

You can get the latest WARN Team forecast in the NewsOn6.com Weather section.