WASHINGTON COUNTY, Oklahoma - Firefighters are working to control a wildfire in Washington county that's already burned 600 acres. The fire has been burning for days now.

National Forestry Service helicopters have filled up with water in a Washington County rancher's pond, and their goal is to douse the flames burning on Circle Mountain as many times as possible. 

Washington County resident Toby Farris lives just down the hill from where the fire has been burning for days.

"I'm right here on the edge of that.. so I was nervous," Farris said. 

Farris said his family has been watching the flames just behind their property since Tuesday night, and they've been happy to see the firefighting aircraft.

"He was pulling water right there and then circling back and dumping it just right here and it was just a real tight circle," Farris said. 

That air support has been crucial to the volunteers and fire departments battling what's proven to be a difficult fire. Carey Cox is the Washington County

Emergency Manager and the fire chief for the county fire department. 

"This has been extremely difficult, the terrain has probably been our biggest problem a lot of this has been literally vertical and very heavy timber in most places. No public access at all, no roads or trails that really gained us access o the fire," said Washington County Emergency Management Kary Cox.

Cox says the aircraft have been vital in getting this wildfire under control. And he said they stick around as long as they need them. 

Which is good news to neighbors like Farris, who is watching the fire closely.

"Luckily it ain't jumping and coming my way," Farris said. 

Also, the Sutton Avian Research Center is in the clear. The fire near them is contained. And firefighters said as of Wednesday, no homes are threatened. 

They will continue to monitor the situation until they are confident the fire is completely out.