SAND SPRINGS, Oklahoma - A Sand Springs man is out $4,000 after being targeted in an elaborate scam.

Steven Taff said the whole thing sounded real. The voicemail, the phone call, even the person on the other line. Taff said he was just trying to protect his family until he realized too late it was a scam.

Steven Taff received 11 voice mails that said, "this is a suspension notice we have received against a Social Security number by the federal crime and investigation department."

When he called the number back he said a person on the other end of the phone told him his social security number and his name had been used to open 22 different bank accounts in excess of $30 million.

"They gave me their names their badge number, told me exactly where they were located," said Steven Taff.

He said they told him to take money out of his account, use it to buy target gift cards, and then give them the codes. He even admitted that thought it was a scam but said it sounded so real.

"I had to have my phone open and in my pocket so they could hear the conversation, they continued to remind me that the FBI was continuing to record these phone calls," said Taff.

Taff took $4,000 out of his savings, money he was going to spend on a trip, and was told by the scammer the money would be given to the Federal Reserve and that he would get it back. Tulsa Police said one way to prevent yourself from being scammed is to keep your personal information private.

"Keep your personal information to yourself, keep it private, don't sign up for every boat and car show that's out there," said Cpl. Matt Rose with the Tulsa Police Department.

Taff said he's telling his story to warn others so something like this does not happen again.

News On 6 called the numbers Taff said the calls came from. Two of them were disconnected but the third spoofed Tulsa Police's number exactly. Police said if you suspect your being scammed, hang up and report it.