TULSA, Oklahoma - With 3D glasses on and thousands of high-quality images, employees at Tulsa-based Aerial Data Service are getting a unique look at the flooding.

Vice President Doug Ward says they've coordinated with different local agencies to take high-quality pictures of flooding from the sky. Using a plane and several cameras, crews have been hard at work.

"They're going to use it so they know what the extents of the flooding were at the high level mark,” said Ward. “The city of Tulsa also has imagery from the '86 flood, so they'll be able to look at the two data sets and compare and see where it's similar and where it's changed."

Using that data, along with ground models, the city will then be able to take measurements and use the imagery like a map.

"Hopefully they'll be able to use it for analysis and determine what they might be able to do to minimize future damage,” he said.

And that damage expands beyond just Tulsa.

Earlier this week, crews flew above Muskogee taking dramatic before and after pictures of flooding there.

And they took even more high-quality pictures from directly above it.

Ward says in his 25 years of work with the company, he's never seen flooding like this.

"The extents of it are unbelievable and how many people are impacted,” said Ward.