TULSA, Oklahoma - Hundreds walked through downtown Tulsa, hoping Terence Crutcher’s death can bring some peace and understanding.

After the march, crowds gathered again, for a rally at the Jazz Hall of Fame where Reverend Al Sharpton spoke.

The crowd’s energy was intense, but just like we've seen at other protests, it was very peaceful.

They called the event the National Prayer and Call for Justice, but the rally felt like a church service.

The music set the tone of worship for people rallying and waiting for the different speakers to hit the stage.

The crowd intently listened to the pastors and attorneys, but more so anticipated what long time civil rights activist Al Sharpton had to say, and that eagerness showed as he took the stage.

Sharpton started off emphasizing that the goal of coming to Tulsa isn't to incite a riot or spark panic; he said if anything, he's coming to support.

But he’s also calling for action.

He said in a world where a New York bomber can be taken into custody alive, a man not doing anything illegal should be too.

"Every time you march, every time you rally, you add value to the life of your children, so they know they are not gonna do whatever they want to do," Sharpton said.

He said, in addition to what Officer Betty Shelby is charged with, he's calling for all the officers on scene to be investigated, too; specifically calling out an officer in the helicopter who called Crutcher a "bad dude" moments before the fatal shot.

Sharpton said, "How do you know what a bad dude is? Because when I look at Terence Crutcher, he looks a lot like all of us. And if all of us look like bad dudes then any of us could end up like Terence.”

The civil rights activist left the stage with urging people to keep on pushing.

"No justice no peace, no justice no peace, no justice no peace,” he said.

If you’d like to keep up with the case, the Crutcher family has created a website so you can stay informed.