TULSA COUNTY, Oklahoma - Jurors in Michael Bever's murder trial learned graphic details about the victims' injuries.

The medical examiner who performed the autopsy on parents David and April Bever testified Tuesday, saying he recorded 28 total wounds on David's body.

Dr. Joshua Lanter said David Bever was stabbed multiple times in the back, chest, stomach, arms, face, and neck. He said the neck wound hit a major artery that would have caused someone to bleed to death even without other injuries.

Lanter said David also had internal bleeding, as well as blunt force injuries, on different parts of his body.

The doctor said he wouldn't expect David to have lived for more than a few minutes.

Dr. Lanter also showed a diagram outlining where April Bever was stabbed 48 times, including in the back, chest, neck, face, and head.

He said she had defensive wounds on her hands - so many that the skin was hanging off.

April also had blunt force trauma and internal bleeding, according to Dr. Lanter.

Michael became emotional as the medical examiner detailed the injuries to his mother.

"Keep in mind that this is his family," said defense attorney Corbin Brewster.  "I think sometimes attorneys and people in the courtroom lose sight of that.  He's a person, he lost members of his family, and it is emotional for him."

A hand and footprint analyst also took the stand on day eight of testimony.

An Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation analyst said she examined bloody hand and footprints from Michael Bever in multiple rooms of the house the day after the murders.

Meghan Jones said she was on the scene for about 11 hours that day. She said she identified Michael's handprints on the front door and the door leading into his bedroom where his father, David, was found.

Jones said she also found Michael's footprints all over the kitchen, some inside his bedroom, his younger brothers' bedroom and on the door leading into the bathroom where Christopher and Victoria Bever were found.

Jurors were shown comparisons of Michael's prints taken at the jail next to the prints collected from the home.

Jones said she did not personally identify Robert Bever's prints anywhere but said that could be because he was wearing gloves and boots. She said she was not in charge of testing shoe prints.