As the investigation into possible mass graves in Tulsa gets underway, a group of 17 people are overseeing the process.

Along with city and state politicians, there are faith leaders, like Reverend Robert Turner from the Historic Vernon AME Church. 

"This is not just a city initiative. I believe this to be God's work,” Turner said.

Mayor G.T. Bynum said Thursday the City of Tulsa has not earned the trust from the public when it comes to the Race Massacre.

"Both in its actions to fail to protect black Tulsans during the massacre, and to wait 98 years to actually start this investigation, instead of doing it right after the massacre occurred,” he said.

He said the committee is relying on people outside of city government to hold it accountable.

"He is absolutely right to make sure this process is as transparent as possible, to earn the credibility of the people in the community that you're trying to help bring some healing toward,” Turner said.

Reverend Turner has offered for any remains found to be buried at a green space at his church.

"Because those folks lived on Greenwood. They died on Greenwood. In the Greenwood District. They ought to be brought back home,” he said.

But until everyone knows more about what's underground, Turner knows where his focus is at.

"Part of my role is to help remind the committee that this is not just a city initiative. This is a spiritual process. This is a morally right thing to do,” Turner said.

The next meeting about the mass graves will be July 18th at the Rudisill Library. The public is encouraged to attend and share any information or stories they might have.