Stopping Puppy Mills


Monday, November 5th 2007, 8:06 pm
By: News On 6


An Oklahoma state lawmaker is taking a big step toward regulating dog breeders across the state. It is legislation that could make 'puppy mills' a thing of the past, and News On 6 anchor Jennifer Loren reports it is a statet law that could break Oklahoma's reputation as a safe-haven for bad dog business.

"Oklahoma's not going to be a puppy mill state any longer," state Representative Lee Denney of Cushing said.

State Representative Lee Denney is a veterinarian by trade. As a state Representative she is tackling Oklahoma's puppy mill problems. She says the problems are perpetuated by our state's lack of breeding and selling regulations.

"Actually its pretty much a free for all," said Representative Denney.

In a puppy mill female dogs become puppy factories, and the puppies are kept in unsanitary conditions. Puppy Mills have recently become a worse problem in our state because other states have made them illegal.

"So these puppy mill breeders have just picked up and moved to rural Oklahoma where no one is watching what they're doing. That absolutely has happened," Denney said.

Denney says now is the time to stop puppy mills here too, she has written a draft of a law she is trying to pass. It's called the Oklahoma Pet Quality Assurance and Protection Act. The draft of the bill states that people who sell more than 25 dogs a year must get a Quality Assurance License.

To quality for a Quality Assurance License breeders must be at least 21-years-old and pass a written exam. They must also meet some basic requirements including breeding standards, housing and sanitation, veterinary care, exercise and socialization and lineage certification. The requirements will be enforced by inspectors.

"What we're looking for is sanitary conditions, welfare and health of these animals, as good as it could possibly be until they get it to their new owner," state Representative Lee Denney of Cushing said.

And Denney is taking the next step toward making her legislation law with a public knowledge-sharing session at the state capitol Tuesday. That meeting is open to the public. It is Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. at the state capitol in Oklahoma City, in 412 C.

"Is to get ideas from breeders as well as people who have been duped by puppy mills. So we can see the scope of the problem in the state and then perhaps work out a solution," said Denney.

Representative Denney hopes to get enough feedback to write feasible legislation and start it on the road to becoming law.

Watch the video: Lawmaker Working To Shut Down Puppy Mills

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Representative Lee Denney On Puppy Mills

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