TULSA, Oklahoma - Tulsa has a new gang rearing its ugly head, and this gang is known for two things, dealing meth and hurting people they think betray them.

Police say Indian Brotherhood members think nothing of kidnapping, raping or beating someone, especially women. A few weeks ago, they tried to cut off a girl's finger in Tulsa.

The Indian Brotherhood is a prison gang that's been around for a while, but, they've been much more visible on Tulsa streets in the past year.

Quinton Shavers was beaten to death last November in a house on North Trenton. Police say George July and Angel Proctor did it; they've been charged and are waiting on trial.

Police say July and Proctor also kidnapped and terribly beat up two women and forced them to witness that murder. They say July is an Indian Brotherhood member and enforcer.

They say I.B.H. members have no regard for women and will do whatever it takes if someone owes them a drug debt or violates their code.

"They use them like property, they beat them, they rape them, they taze them, they get them strung out on dope," said Sergeant Dave Walker with the Tulsa Police.

July is an ex-con and he and Proctor have been charged with violent crimes before, but, those charges were dismissed because victims and witnesses refused to show up and testify. This is a problem police are seeing over and over when I.B.H. is involved.

"They're for real. I see why people don't want to testify, but by the same regard, with what they're living in, how could they not testify," Walker said.

Police say just like when the Crips gang turns violent, it's generally on other gang members, they say the Indian Brotherhood is generally committing violence against people in their drug world, not average, law abiding citizens.

"I think you have to do something against their code to end up with your fingers cut off, or witnessing a murder or being murdered yourself," Walker said.

Police believe there's an I.B.H. connection to the four people shot, execution style, inside a home on North New Haven last November. They say people who know something, are so wrapped up in the meth world and so afraid of retribution, they're not talking, so those four murders remain unsolved.

Police say the people getting hurt are people involved in the methamphetamine world. They get so hooked on drugs they are willing to do anything to get their next fix.