At least two families have already been forced from their homes after a week of heavy rainfall caused storm water to build up and flood homes in low-lying areas of Wagoner.


The city brought in emergency pumps four days ago. The water levels fell slightly, but with more rain, it could take even longer for people to get into their flooded homes.


Stormwater normally drains into Fort Gibson Lake, but the lake is already three feet from flood stage.


Four pumps have been moving 18 millions of water a day from the retention ponds to the lake. The city rainwater has collected near Dike Number 10. Under normal conditions, the rainwater flows right into the lake, but the high lake level is preventing them from opening up a drain valve.


Mayor Albert Jones and City Superintendent Larry Morgan are working to keep the pumps running so the water doesn't back up.


"We're just keeping a watchful eye on it," said Mayor Albert Jones. "We're doing everything in our power, and we are fighting to maintain and we are maintaining. We are dropping that level as we speak.




"Trying to keep the water out; we're making headway right now," said City Superintendent Larry Morgan. "We had two pumps online, we had a little problem with one of them. We've gained some ground last night, and we'll continue on a 24/7 operation until we get it down to something we feel is safe."


At least two families escaped the high flood waters. Neighbors are watching to see if the flood waters creep toward their homes.


The Corps of Engineers provided 7,000 sandbags to help area residents.