TAHLEQUAH, Oklahoma - Hundreds turned out Tuesday night for a rally to support a North Dakota tribe trying to block construction of an oil pipeline.

It was the second rally in less than a week being held in Oklahoma.

Hundreds showed up in Tahlequah to show their support for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, there was even a banner that is going to be heading to North Dakota.

Cherokee Nation principal chief, Bill John Baker said, “We need to be leaving the water, the air and the land in as good or better shape than we found it."

Tuesday's rally was a call to action.

"It makes my heart bleed for our native people that are out there,” said Cherokee Nation citizen, Wyanetta Springwater. “To see all these people here come here and to show our support for our native people."

In the past month, Native Americans in Oklahoma increased their support for the Standing Rock Sioux.

Last week, a federal judge denied the North Dakota tribe's effort to halt the pipeline construction, but the Obama administration stepped in, asking for a halt in the project.

Even though construction of the pipeline is delayed, rallies like the one in the capital city of the Cherokee Nation are attracting supporters from all backgrounds.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe supporter, Ben Berry said, "It's just amazing to see this level of unity come together nationwide."

"Water is essential to all beings, regardless of what your nationality is or skin tone is, or what our lineage is. We all have to have water to live," supporter Kate Gibson said.

The Cherokee Nation didn't sanction the rally, but the tribal council passed a resolution Monday night showing support for the Standing Rock Sioux.