CLEVELAND, Oklahoma - The state fire marshal said a malfunctioning floor buffer ignited a chemical that workers were using to clean the floor of an airplane parts plant just south of Cleveland.

Two employees were hurt and are recovering in the hospital but were able to speak to the fire marshal as part of the investigation.

As for the plant itself, the fire chief said parts of the building are on the verge of collapsing, and, in many cases, it’s unsafe for firefighters to go inside.

The owner of the company was too shaken up to talk to the media Wednesday.

Former worker David Carter said, "He's a great guy. Really took care of his employees. I think he started this thing in his garage many, many years ago."

The plant has grown and is considered an important part of the Cleveland community; it’s where many people in Cleveland have worked for nearly two decades.

Now, 35 hard workers don’t know what the future holds.

For Mike Mills, who started ICES Corporation in his garage in 1994 before growing into the 60,000 square foot facility nearly 17 years ago, the loss has been especially hard.

Cleveland fire chief, Ryan Murray said, “It's really devastating for something like this to happen. It hurts.”

Murray said two workers were inside cleaning floors Tuesday afternoon when the fire ignited. He said it burned a 54-year-old worker on his hands and ears and left a 31-year-old man with third-degree burns on his arms and legs.

No one else was inside because the plant was closed for the holidays.

Murray said, “If the employees had been here it could've been a whole lot worse than it was.”

Still, the outcome is tough.

Right now, about 35 people don't have a job to go to come Monday. Mayor Brian Torres said the airplane parts manufacturer is one of the town's largest employers.

“This will make a big impact to us as Cleveland. There's not very many businesses in town itself that employs this many people,” Torres said.

He said the direct impact on the economy would be about $40,000 a year.

Of course, the loss to the company's owner is far greater - though Torres said the owner is more concerned about his employees.

“That was his first thing he told me was, like, 'Man, I've got payroll coming up and all these people need a job.' So, I honestly think he's got the heart and the mindset that he wants to rebuild. He wants to keep it rolling. I can't imagine why he wouldn't,” Torres said.

And the mayor said he'll do whatever he can to make sure that if the plant reopens, it does so in Cleveland.

“I want them to stay here. Don't want them to go anywhere else,” he said.

One employee said the owner would like to reopen, but that will depend on what happens with the insurance. An agent is expected to visit the building Thursday, then, on Monday, the owner plans to meet with all the employees about future plans.

One employee said the owner would like to reopen, but that will depend on what happens with the insurance. An agent is expected to visit the building Thursday, then, on Monday, the owner plans to meet with all the employees about future plans.