SAND SPRINGS -- For many families living along the river, it's going to take a long time to clean up from the extreme flooding.

In Sand Springs, people are just beginning to pick up the pieces.

People in this neighborhood tell me it'll likely take months for them to rebuild.
 
They've spent the day moving their belongings out of their homes.. and assessing the damage the floodwater left behind.
 
 "As far as we know, four feet or so, a total loss on the first level," Sherry Everett said.
 
It's day two of cleanup for Sherry Everett and her family, after the water has finally receded.
 
"It's pretty devastating because our neighborhood was not prepared," Sherry Everett said.
 
The currents swept through their home and yard. The floodwater ruined carpet and hardwood floor, pushed items across their house, and tore furniture apart.
 
The Everett's say it'll likely take several months to rebuild.
 
A few blocks away, Gary and Penny Oyler are moving everything out to dry.
 
When Keystone Dam was releasing 250,000 cubic feet of water every second, they watched helplessly as the water filled the crawlspace below their home.
 
"Then when they raised it higher, it came into the house," Penny Oyler said.
 
They aren't in the flood-plain, and didn't have flood insurance, but just across the street -- their daughter did.
 
"She couldn't get anything out, to get to her house we were walking through water up to here," Penny Oyler said. "Waist deep."
 
As the families living in this neighborhood start the recovery process, they say the support from those around them has been overwhelming.
 
 "It's stinky, it's yucky, but we have friends helping us so it's a blessing," Penny Oyler said.
 

"We have amazing neighbors, our community has come together really well, but Oklahoma always comes together in a crisis," Sherry Everett said.