More than 300 New Oklahoma Laws Take Effect November 1


Friday, November 1st 2019, 5:08 am
By: Shannon Rousseau


More than 300 laws take effect Friday, November 1, which includes Francine's Law, selfies with election ballots, and permitless carry.

It is now legal to carry a gun--either concealed or unconcealed--in Oklahoma if you're 21 or older, or 18 if you have military experience. You also don't need a permit. However, there are some exceptions.

You can't carry a gun, whether concealed or unconcealed, inside any government building, courthouse, school, sports arena, or casino.

Francine's Law, which is named after Francine Frost, who disappeared in Tulsa in the early 80s also takes effect Friday. 

Francine's law will now require law enforcement agencies across Oklahoma to enter all missing persons into a national database within 30 days.

Law enforcement will also need to get the following information immediately: the missing person's medical and dental history, voluntary DNA samples from family members to establish a genetic profile, and fingerprints from any available resource.

Starting Friday, every Oklahoma driver will have to move over at least one lane from any vehicle parked on the side of the road with flashing lights.

If you can't move over, you have to at least slow down, and this applies to both emergency and non-emergency vehicles.

As of November 1, the turnpike can increase the speed limit to 80 miles an hour, but the Turnpike Authority says that won't actually happen on Friday. They still need to run some studies. So, the speed limit will stay the same for now.

There are also changes concerning election ballots. 

You still can't tell or show anyone your ballot as to how you voted while in an election enclosure, but you can take a picture of your ballot and post it on social media. This goes for absentee ballots as well.

Some of the new laws also impact inmates. And starting Friday, the Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board will commute about 500 inmates sentences.

These are people convicted of non-violent crimes that, today, would be misdemeanors. 

Donations will allow those inmates to get state IDs, or drivers licenses, when they're released at no cost to them or to taxpayers.

Lastly, a new law may be one of the oddest as it involves meat.

As of November 1, the ribeye steak is the official state steak of Oklahoma; just chew on that one for a bit.