First District Congressional Candidates Get Out The Vote As Election Nears


Sunday, November 4th 2012, 9:38 pm
By: News On 6


Candidates in Oklahoma's District 1 congressional race are fighting to set themselves apart, as Election Day looms.

They're battling for the seat John Sullivan currently holds.

If the end of Tuesday night sees a decisive winner, the Tulsa metro, all the way up to Bartlesville will soon have a new Congressman.

Republican candidate Jim Bridenstine is a Jenks High School graduate and military man.

His campaign team is pulling out all the stops to make sure voters show up at the polls.

"Our team is working excessively hard trying to get every last voter, shake every last hand, convince every last person, because we know how important this election is," Bridenstine said.

Democratic candidate John Olson is a war veteran and small businessman.

His campaign also spent the weekend mingling with people all over the district, trying to gather any last minute voters.

"We are getting things set up to take people to the polls early. We're making sure we get out the vote. We're calling everybody to remind them that the polls are open on Tuesday, they're open on Monday, and we're making it as easy as possible for people to go vote," Olson said.

The Independent in the race is Craig Allen.

He's a commercial airline pilot.

"I've rode around town a little bit. I've been up and down the sidewalks, mostly downtown and some Jenks today, and just talk[ing] to people," Allen said.

9/18/2012 Related Story: First District Congressional Candidates Face Off In Bartlesville

Bridenstine says, if he's elected, he plans to hit the ground running.

"We believe that we need to repeal Obamacare and end the regulatory environment on small businesses to get our economy growing, and I think that's where most people in the first district are," Bridenstine said.

And Olson wants to take "common sense" to congress.

"I want to represent the values of Oklahoma and bring Oklahoma values to Washington—not the other way around," Olson said.

No matter the outcome of the race, Allen said he feels he's accomplished his main goal: To be a voice for non-partisan voters.

"It allows us to, quite frankly, just represent the people without special interest," Allen said. "I've been a lifelong Republican and I changed, because I just got nowhere and I didn't feel like I was getting my money's worth."

Regardless of your party affiliation, the candidates agree it's important for everyone to exercise your right to vote.

Early voting continues Monday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The lines may look long, but the County Election Board says the average wait is only about 20 minutes.

You will need a state-issued photo ID or your voter registration card to cast a ballot.

11/4/2012 Related Story: What You Need To Know Before You Vote