Weather Extremes For Tuesday


Wednesday, September 26th 2007, 6:38 am
By: News On 6


WEATHER EXTREMES FOR TUESDAY:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)............98 Laredo, TX

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)............103 Corpus Christi, TX

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).............22 Meacham, OR

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)..............16 Leadville, CO

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH)....................63 Holland, MI

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..............2.73 Alexandria, LA

NATIONAL WEATHER SUMMARY

In the East, a cold front and associated low pressure system brought showers and thunderstorms to the Great Lakes and parts of the Ohio Valley. To the south, a few showers impacted Florida, with no severe storms. Most rainfall totals were around a tenth to a quarter of an inch; but some locally higher totals were greater than an inch. For example, Miami, Florida reported 1-point-53 inches of rainfall. Warm and humid conditions, with partly cloudy skies, were reported in most the Southeast, while unseasonably warm temperatures were observed in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic.

In the western two-thirds of the country, a cold front draped from the Great Lakes down to the Southern plains brought showers and thunderstorms to the Central and Southern Plains. A few storms became locally strong, however, no major damage was reported. Deep tropical moisture brought rain showers to the Middle and Lower Mississippi Valleys, with no significant storms. However, a few moderately heavy rainfall amounts were reported. 1-point-23 inches of rain fell in Iowa City, Iowa, while 1-point-29 inches was observed in Kansas City, Missouri. Heavy rainfall totals contributed to flash flooding in places such as outside West Plains, Missouri.

City, State Rainfall Totals (Inches)

Alexandria, LA 2.89

Monroe, LA 1.96

Muskogee, OK 1.74

Kansas City, MO 1.29

Iowa City, IA 1.23

Debuque, IA 1.18

Dry weather prevailed with cool conditions behind the front in the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest. No severe storms were reported with this activity. Further west, a broad area of surface high pressure kept conditions generally dry and cool across much of the Rockies and High Plains. Elsewhere, conditions were somewhat warmer across the Pacific Northwest, Great Basin, California, and the Desert Southwest.

ON THIS DATE IN HISTORY

In 1945, a record low of four degrees Fahrenheit is record in Parshall, North Dakota. Accompaning this record is a strong freeze all along the northern Plains and Middle Mississippi Valley.

In 1970, fire weather along the southern California caused over five hundred thousand acres to burn and temperatures to reach 105 degrees in Los Angeles, California and 103 degrees in Long Beach, California. Santa Ana Winds drove most of the blazes which injured twenty firemen.

In 1971, a cloud seeding project, code-named "Stormfury" with the objective to strengthen or weaken tropical cyclones, took place off of the eastern Florida coast.

FRONTS ACROSS THE NATION

A cold front is draped across the Lower Michigan, Illinois and Missouri.

A stationary front is located over Oklahoma and northern Texas.

A warm front is over North Dakota.

NATIONAL WEATHER FORECAST

In the East, a cold front will produce wide-spread showers and a few strong to severe thunderstorms across the Northeast, and the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys. Frequent lightning, strong winds, sizable hail, and heavy downpours may accompany the strongest storms. Rainfall amounts of an inch will be possible. Further south, partly cloudy skies with a chance for afternoon and evening showers and thunderstorms can be expected along the coast of the Carolinas, southern Georgia, and down through Florida. No severe weather is expected; however, heavy downpours of up to an inch will be possible. Otherwise, fair skies and dry conditions will prevail through the Great Lakes region, the Mid-Atlantic region, and much of the Southeast. High temperatures will reach into the 60s and 70s across the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Valley; and into the 70s to the lower 90s through the Northeast, the Mid-Atlantic region, the Tennessee Valley, the Southeast, and Florida.

Across the central part of the country, a stationary front will produce mostly cloudy skies and the chance for showers and thunderstorms across the Lower Mississippi Valley and much of the southern Plains. A few stronger thunderstorms and rainfall amounts of close to an inch will be possible with this activity. Elsewhere, a cold front will bring the chance for showers and thunderstorms to the northern Plains and the Upper Mississippi Valley. No severe weather is expected and rainfall amounts will remain light. Otherwise, fair skies and dry conditions will prevail across the rest of the region. High temperatures will reach into the 60s and 70s through the northern and central Plains, and the Upper and Middle Mississippi Valley; and into the upper 70s to the lower 90s across the southern Plains and the Lower Mississippi Valley.

In the West, expect partly cloudy skies with the chance for afternoon and evening showers and thunderstorms across the southern high Plains. A few strong thunderstorms will be capable of producing dangerous lightning, gusting winds, small hail, and brief downpours. Rainfall amounts will remain light. Elsewhere, mostly cloudy skies with the chance for light rain showers can be expected across northwestern portions of the Pacific Northwest. Otherwise, high pressure will allow for mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies and dry conditions throughout the northern and central Plains, the Rocky Mountains, the Desert Southwest, the Great Basin, California, and much of the Pacific Northwest. High temperatures will reach into the 60s and 70s across the Pacific Northwest, the Great Basin, the northern and central Rocky Mountains, and the northern and central high Plains; and into the 80s and 90s through the southern high Plains, the southern Rocky Mountains, the Desert Southwest, and much of California.

Prepared by WeatherBank, Inc.