End Of School Year In Webbers Falls Disrupted For 2nd Year In A Row


Wednesday, May 13th 2020, 8:54 pm
By: Matt Rahn


WEBBERS FALLS, Okla. - Students in Webbers Falls are returning laptops, textbooks, and other supplies this week as their school year comes to an end.

For many schools, it was an odd year, but COVID-19 wasn't the only thing making this year unusual for students at Webbers Falls.

School staff said some students are eager to start their summer vacation, while others are left disappointed after a year riddled with setbacks.

If you walk into the school building at Webbers Falls, all you’ll see are empty hallways. A ghost town that hasn't seen students in weeks.

"Our last day was the Thursday before spring break, we had parent-teacher conferences that Thursday evening and we did not return to school after that," said Principal Lisa Ward. 

Principal Ward is referring to the beginning of the COVID-19 Pandemic, an event that’s made a huge impact on students.

"They are very disappointed. You know, we have observed a lot of frustration by the seniors and their families. They feel they've been robbed, and they have," Ward said.

Friday marks the end of the year, so students are coming by the school to drop off things like laptops and textbooks. School Nurse Judy Treadwell helps manage the laptops and has seen mixed emotions from students.

"I think they're happy to get rid of them and get their summer started. I've had some students they're saddened because we've had to not finish out their school year especially our seniors," Treadwell said.

Like other schools, they've missed about two months of in-class instruction, a huge blow for a district just getting back to normal after last spring's historic flooding left the school in shambles, forcing them to start a month late in the fall.

"We lost everything," said Principal Ward.

She said it's been hard, but community support has made it easier. 

"Honestly, I think the fact that we had endured something large scale like the flood, actually helped us. Our resilience is better than it was before because of that," Ward said.

School leaders said they're still looking at options for when school starts back up in the fall.